reading list

By Hudson Berry

Marketing

02.08.22

Our favorite place to reflect is (you guessed it) the bathtub. We've pulled together a list of reads to celebrate black history and the importance of critical thinking.

A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn

Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History of the United States is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of -- and in the words of -- America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, working poor, and immigrant laborers.

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

“Born A Crime” is a collection of personal stories about growing up in South Africa during the last gasps of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that came with its demise. Already known for his incisive social and political commentary, here Noah turns his focus inward, giving readers an intimate look at the world that shaped him. These are true stories, sometimes dark, occasionally bizarre, frequently tender, and always hilarious.

What if Instead of Calling People Out, We Called Them In? by Professor Loretta J. Ross

Dive into this NYT article for a free lecture from Professor Ross, who challenges cancel culture to help people become comfortable with and open to uncomfortable conversations.

Black Buck by Mateo Askaripour

Looking for witty, sizzling and easy to read with a satirical tone that turns straight up comical at times? This satirical story follows the evolution of Darren aka ‘Buck’s and explores the toxicity of corporate America, white supremacy, gentrification, racism, and inequality. 

The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates

This is the dramatic story of an atrocity inflicted on generations of women, men, and children—the violent and capricious separation of families—and the war they waged to simply make lives with the people they loved. Written by one of today’s most exciting thinkers and writers, The Water Dancer is a propulsive, transcendent work that restores the humanity of those from whom everything was stolen.

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Homegoing follows the parallel paths of sisters and their descendants through eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. This extraordinary novel illuminates slavery’s troubled legacy both for those who were taken and those who stayed—and shows how the memory of captivity has been inscribed on the soul of our nation.

Similar entries

toxic self-talk

By Cecile Storm

02.10.21

the healer's reading list

By Cecile Storm

07.17.21

the optimal zone

By Shannon Vaughn

01.25.22

toxic self-talk

By Cecile Storm

02.10.21

the healer's reading list

By Cecile Storm

07.17.21

the optimal zone

By Shannon Vaughn

01.25.22

Newsletter

Get 15% off when you sign up for our email newsletter! Stay up to date with our journal entries, promos and sales.

 

Got a Question?

Check the FAQs

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


2022 © Pursoma All Rights Reserved.